Friedrich Kröhnke

Friedrich Kröhnke »created in the past 25 years his very own idiom … a sense for linguistic intensity and narrative dramaturgy, which is very rare these days.« (Tobias Lehmkuhl, Deutschlandradio)

Yorck Kronenberg

Kronenberg skilfully evokes the secrets, menaces, but also the magic of a foreign and lonely world.

Andreas Kurz

Andreas Kurz‘ literature breathes great affection for people and things and for everything that occurs to us daily.

Olga Martynova

Olga Martynova, lyric poet and essayist, presents difficult situations with enchanting ease.

Ilma Rakusa

»Ilma Rakusa is a solitaire.« (Thomas Rothschild, Freitag)

Almut Tina Schmidt

»It is fun to see how the author deconstructs conventions with wit and relish and how she traces unspoken truths.« (Jürgen Wicht,

Stefan Schmitzer

In his first novel, Stefan Schmitzer takes the reader to troublesome spots in our cities, our social lives.

Werner Schwab

»Schwab – the genius, monster, creep« (German weekly Die Zeit) was among the common reactions Schwab’s provocations were met with.

Thomas Stangl

If you can, read a book by Stangl. Or translate him. You won’t be sorry. If Stangl continues at this rate, he will become one of the language’s most important writers. Already he’s one of its best.

Bernhard Strobel

Bernhard Strobel’s narratives depict people in crises, tense atmospheres in the family, among friends or neighbours. We read dialogues on the verge of conflict, oscillating between belligerence and tight-lippedness.

Andreas Unterweger

A new literary discovery – Unterwegers novels are kaleidoscopes of living and loving.

David Wagner

»The Proust-inspired West German stylist« (New York Times)